• Give Skem Men-Aces Recognition On One Of Our Many Roundabouts
    Skem Men-Aces is one of the most highly decorated disability football teams in the country and deserves some recognition within it's hometown by way of a permanent sign on one of our many roundabouts. Most advertising signs, on our roundabouts, are empty and it would be great to see one turned permanently into a "Home of The Skem Men-Aces" sign. Skem Men-Aces is a real jewel in the crown of the wonderful things this town has to offer and it would be a fitting tribute to such an incredible club that has even won the Queens Award for voluntary services.
    107 of 200 Signatures
    Created by James Upjohn
  • No parking space
    I have to park further away as some residents have more than two cars parked I have mobility issues but not enough to get a disabled line
    4 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Sana Mehmood
  • Don't make diabetics the new care home crisis
    Current medical data from a significant NHS England study shows that diabetics, especially Type 1 diabetes which is not directly related to obesity, are at significantly increased risk of dying from Covid 19 (more than 3 times higher than a non-diabetic for Type 1, and more than 2 times higher for Type 2). The risk is such that the leading diabetes charity Diabetes UK is calling for the government to ensure employers either continue to furlough diabetics or allow them to work from home even with the easing of lockdown restrictions. This plea has been ignored, and so thousands of diabetics will be forced back to work and to a massively increased risk of death. It is a blatant disregard for their own official medical data and for human life. My husband is a Type 1 diabetic and has been for over thirty years, very rarely missing a days work and contributing hugely to his workplace - I do not want to see him sent to his death because the government refuse to acknowledge the facts and put appropriate shielding advice in place.
    95 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Helen Compton
  • Disability
    It is important for the DWP to officially declare this as Medical Disability which has No cure just medications but they don't really work also if you have it you should automatically be able to claim pip for it as affects your nervous system so difficult to just to do normal things about house etc it also make you have dizzy spells lack of use of arms legs mobility as constant pain . Have to have help with care and cooking etc also cant go out much as No energy and breathing problems this is Something that Needs to be Classed as Permanent disability it is in other countries.
    1 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Malcolm Davey Picture
  • Make fibromyalgia and other invisible illnesses recognised disabilities.
    I know from suffering with fibromyalgia myself and how it also affects others that we are vulnerable also. Even coming down with common cold can have many more complications for a sufferer than a otherwise healthy person. I rarely pick up one bug or virus, it often comes with another such as chest infections, tonsillitis and more. Suggesting that these illnesses certainly do have a huge impact on a sufferers immune system. However this and other invisible chronic illnesses are not listed as auto immune diseases. Let alone recognised as a disability.
    9 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Hazel Dymond Picture
  • Ppe clear window on face mask so deaf/ hard of hearing people can lip read
    Because deaf and hard of hearing people rely on lip reading
    41 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Tina Bridge Picture
  • We desperately need support for invisible carers
    Over 8 million people who care for relatives at home are being ignored. Many of us are shielding vulnerable people, we can’t get delivery slots because we’re not on the most vulnerable list. We don’t want to go out for fear of bringing the virus home. When we can get deliveries they’re more expensive because we’re having to order from specialist, local shops. We are being expected to cope on our own, with extremely limited budgets and no support. We work 24/7 taking the strain off the NHS and social services by caring for our loved ones and we are being IGNORED.
    67 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Mandm Tog Picture
  • Carers Allowance
    This is important as carers that look after family members do a hard job like myself we are just like a doctor, nurse or even someone that works in a care home as we work all day and night cleanIng and looking after our loved ones. I myself was walking full time as was my partner until she got these disability in 2010. We are a group of people that do a fantastic job but unfortunately we are forgotten about and now is the time to high light this problem so that all carers including myself get a proper living wage.
    4 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Andrew Powley Picture
  • Covid19 Bill - Disabled and vulnerable adults and children
    Dear Prime Minister I believe that the #CoronaVirusBill presents a real and present danger to the lives of disabled people. The government’s plans for disabled children and adults during the crisis are effectively rolling back 30 years of progress for disabled people. The government’s plans are to: remove disabled people’s rights to social care change the duties to meet children’s educational requirements to a ‘reasonable endeavours’ duty attack the civil liberties of disabled people and erode their rights to support I am asking the government to work closely with disabled people’s organisations and families of disabled people to protect their human rights in a time of crisis. I implore you to fight for the hard fought rights of disabled children, young people and adults and their families and to amend the schedules in the Bill that remove social care and SEND duties and threaten the civil liberties of disabled people. To explain my reasons for writing to you, please see my understanding of negative social implications of the #CoronaVirusBill on the lives of disabled people and their families: Yours sincerely Maxine Pieri What does it mean for disabled adults? The Bill suspends every duty in the Care Act, 2014, including the duty to meet the eligible needs of disabled people (Section 18) and their carers (Section 20). Under the #CoronaVirus Bill, Local Authorities will only have to provide care ‘if they consider it necessary’ for the purposes of avoiding a breach of the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR). There is no human right to social care or positive obligation under the ECHR to meet care needs. Other changes set to be introduced through the #CoronaVirusBill will allow health bodies to delay carrying out an assessment for eligibility for NHS continuing care What does it mean for disabled children and young people? Duties for young people transitioning to adult social care have also been suspended. The Secretary of State for Education will have power to disapply the duty on schools and other institutions to admit a child to a school where they are named on an EHCP. The Secretary of State will be able to vary provisions of the act, such as the core duty to procure provision set out in an EHCP, so instead of being an absolute duty it becomes a ‘reasonable endeavours’ duty, creating a lesser entitlement for up to two years. What about the Mental Health Act? The power to recommend individuals be detained under the Mental Health Act will be implemented using one doctor’s opinion instead of two, making it easier for people to be detained. The proposed bill will temporarily allow the extension or removal of time limits in mental health legislation which means individuals might be released into the community early, or find themselves detained for longer. Under section 5, emergency detention for people already in hospital would extend from 72 hours to 120 hours, and nurses’ holding powers would extend from 6 to 12 hours. Under sections 135 and 136, police powers to detain a person found in need of immediate care at a “place of safety” will extend from 24 hours to 36 hours. Under section 35/36, the cap on how long someone can be held in hospital while awaiting a report (currently 12 weeks) will be lifted. What about the rights of disabled people? Local authorities will have a duty to uphold disabled people’s human rights under the European Convention on Human Rights, BUT the threshold for a breach, in terms of not providing care and support is high, which means that disabled people will be left without care and support. Lack of care and support will have a significant impact on disabled people’s well-being, but may not be considered to reach the threshold for their human rights to have been breached – they will NOT have a right to care and support. Sources of information Watch @stevebroach, Public Law Barrister talk about the impact of the Bill here: https://www.specialneedsjungle.com/steve-broach-public-law-barrister-on-the-coronavirus-bills-implications-for-disabled-children/ Read this Twitter thread for more information: https://twitter.com/JamieBurton29/status/1240781535340568577 Statement from National User Survivor Network: https://www.nsun.org.uk/News/covid-19-and-human-rights Current hashtags: #CoronaVirusBill #CoronavirusBillUK
    9,327 of 10,000 Signatures
    Created by Maxine Pieri
  • Stop SLDC in Kendal from Discriminating against the Disabled
    The council are completely failing to uphold their obligations to those with disabilities and protected characteristics by infringing their right to practice their religion and faith, access to and use of goods, facilities and services, including access to public buildings, shops and leisure facilities and to healthcare, housing and transport, membership of private clubs and use of their facilities. The council has a duty as well as the general rules against subjecting people with disabilities to disability discrimination, most public authorities are under two other duties to promote equality of opportunity for people with disabilities, amongst others. They are also legally required to have due regard to: * promote equality of opportunity between people with a disability and people without (Section 75) * promote positive attitudes towards people with a disability (Section 49A) * encourage the participation of people with a disability in public life (Section 49A) The plans to change the use of area are enforcing completely unfair restrictions and alternatives that are indirectly and directly discriminating against those with Disabilities as they will allow Hirsts and Market Trader traffic to use it but no longer allow access to those who need dropping off outside the door. Some have incredibly heavy and large electric wheelchairs, some that have failed to work in recent months and have required pushing. The councils 'reasonable adjustments' of enforcing that the disabled people must be dropped off at the bottom of the hill and make their way up there is a disgrace. It is a steep and challenging hill for the more able-bodied, let alone those in wheelchairs or their carers. They have already been unfairly restricted by having a very narrow time limit enforced for blue badge parking in the town only between the hours of 11 am and 4 pm which automatically impacts their ability to attend groups and appointments. The council is causing so much disruption with their plans for changing Kendal's town center which is already negatively affecting shops, shoppers and services and now religious freedom and Disability rights, completely disregarding their legal obligations. The Unitarian Chapel has already spent the last few years heavily investing in a new sensory garden and environmental space which is in the process of being rolled out. A large part of this has been to make the Garden space relaxing tranquility for all and have made the plans wheelchair friendly. The council's decisions are not only affecting those who currently attend the Chapel but those new visitors or residents who will be welcomed to spend time in and use the sensory garden in the future. Please sign this petition in support of our Disabled brothers and sisters and stop the infringement of laws and rights that are designed to uphold everyone's rights and ability to access services, groups, and places of worship.
    5 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Danielle Willsher
  • OPEN LETTER: Please don't vote for cuts to special educational needs funding
    On 19th March you and your fellow councillors will be voting on whether to make potentially devastating cuts to the special educational needs budget, which will impact children across the borough. We are calling on you to vote against it. We believe these cuts will prevent schools from properly supporting children with special needs, such as autism, Down’s Syndrome and learning difficulties, and in doing so negatively impact the education of all children in the borough. If these cuts are made, you risk failing in your legal duty under the Children and Families Act 2014 to provide access to education for all children – making the proposals both unethical and likely unlawful. What's more, we believe these cuts are a false economy. Reducing support for children with special educational needs means many will struggle to cope in mainstream education, resulting them falling out of the system completely either through exclusion or school refusal. Parents will then be forced to seek alternative specialist provision, which will cost the council far more in the long run. The proposal is to make a 10% cut to vital top-up funding for children with special educational needs in mainstream schools, as well as cutting the annual budgets of special schools by 1.5%, the maximum allowed by law. Waltham Forest Council will also introduce an unsustainable two-tier system in which new children requiring support face an, as yet, undefined new process. Previous attempts to cut the budget were abandoned after families and schools voiced concerns about how cuts would harm children’s education. Many schools remain uneasy about the cuts, choosing either not to vote or to abstain from voting for them. You should also take note of the high level of community support against cutting the special needs education budget. This is exemplified by the fact that £3,000 for the purposes of taking legal action against the Council was raised through crowdfunding in a matter of days. Furthermore, Waltham Forest SEND Crisis, a grassroots campaign group formed by families, carers and professionals, now has over 300 members. A young person has special educational needs if they have a learning difficulty or disability that calls for special educational provision to be made for them. This can include children with sight or hearing problems, Down's syndrome, learning difficulties, autism, ADHD, dyslexia, dyspraxia, anxiety, depression, as well as children with a physical need requiring additional equipment and support. The extra support children with SEND require is vital to them being able to access an education. You and the other Waltham Forest Councillors must vote against these cuts on 19 March, as they will hurt the children you have a legal duty to support. We implore you to follow the lead of other UK Councils and push back to central government.
    1,937 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Waltham Forest SEND Crisis Action Picture
  • Change the Social work degree to include mental health and SEND and childcare
    To ensure children and young people with complex needs and challenging behaviours, Autism and other hidden disabilities are not wrongly put in a over filled care system. Parents are blamed more often or not for poor parenting, when their children have complex needs and dealing with crisis's daily with no support. Parents are judged wrongly.
    53 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Karen O'Reardon