• Coca-Cola: We don't want single use plastic bottles
    Coca-cola are the biggest plastic polluting company in the world. [1] But today a top executive at the company said people want plastic bottles. Let's tell them this is not what we want. They need to recognise this and lead the way in cutting down single use plastic. [1] Forbes: Coca-Cola Named The World’s Most Polluting Brand in Plastic Waste Audit: https://www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2019/10/29/coca-cola-named-the-worlds-most-polluting-brand-in-plastic-waste-audit/
    1,625 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Amanda Collins
  • Plastic and foil laminated seal inside milk bottle tops
    The efforts to reduce global warming are hampered by actions such as putting unnecessary plastic seals under milk bottles. 1. It is futile to prevent leakage since the bottles do not leak once the seal has been removed and the cap securely replaced. I have never succeeded in losing one drop of milk even though I have tried to by swinging the bottle around. 2. To prevent tampering surely another method should be used which doesn't involve the use of plastic. 3. It is difficult for the elderly and those with arthritic hands to remove the seal.
    23 of 100 Signatures
    Created by John Hart Picture
  • Ban plastic caps on detergent like bold 2 in 1
    With the amount of plastic waste, do we really need more? Walk up and down the supermarket isle for your washing detergents or fabric softeners and the vast majority of them will have a removable plastic head so you can measure the amount of liquid/gel you want to use. Do we really need all these plastic heads? can we not re use the ones we all have lying around our houses?
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Rick Massey
  • Work from Home to reduce Car Emissions
    Reducing CO2 emissions must, logically, be every countries number one priority. All other policies are irrelevant if we don't have a planet!
    23 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Stuart Murray
  • Save 67 centre
    The 67 Centre has been part of the community for over 50 years it has been changing young peoples live and giving them a safe place for them to gather and should be kept as a sanctuary for the next generation. It is also part of Brighton history, because a famous band called the piranhas once played there in the 70's providing young bands from Brighton to perform. In Brighton/ Moulescoomb there isn't a lot of places for the local teenagers to go to but the 67 centre was always there and this allowed kids to stop causing havoc to the locals and lets them chill with there friends and have help from people who are willing to sit there and listen, with the youth group they also help people who have financial constraints to entertain the children and allowing them to go on trips and do activities that they may not usually get to do. The 67 centre allow many young people to make friends with locals that they might have never met, Why would we want to take that away from the younger generation, we have to help save the one place the teenagers have left that isn't taken over by people doing drugs. This petition is to save the 67 centre,if you agree with us to help save it please sign this petition and let us keep the 67 centre!
    8 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Willow Carney
  • Channel 4: Don’t take money from dirty oil giant BP
    Channel 4 have just announced that BP, one of the world’s biggest polluters, will sponsor their Tokyo Paralympic coverage this summer. While the world is facing a climate emergency, Channel 4 should not be entering deals with companies who profit from such disasters. BP is one of the companies most responsible for the climate crisis we’re facing, with Australia burning and species disappearing before our eyes. It is the 11th biggest corporate source of greenhouse emissions in history. By signing a sponsorship deal with BP, Channel 4 are allowing BP to protect and hide behind their brand and image. But huge public pressure from viewers like us could force them to u-turn. Will you add your name now?
    6,165 of 7,000 Signatures
  • Stop cutting Air Passenger Duty
    This is important because this continues to make a form of Transport which has by far the highest carbon footprint a relatively cheap option. The Government should be subsidising and investing heavily in road and rail based public transport if there is any chance of the UK reaching a carbon neutral target by 2030.
    117 of 200 Signatures
    Created by PAUL BARKER
  • Don’t fuel the climate crisis
    Flying produces the highest amount of emissions of any way to travel, and contributes massively to the climate crisis. Despite this, the government is planning to cut air passenger duty for all flights in a bid to save Flybe, when there are other options on the table. At a time when the government should be trying to cut emissions hugely, this shouldn’t happen. It’s important to save jobs, but there are other options to save Flybe other than giving a tax break to all airlines. Cutting air passenger duty would have long-lasting effects, and increase domestic flights when we should be aiming to reduce them to stop the climate crisis.
    4,688 of 5,000 Signatures
  • No more building on green field sites
    Our countryside is being eroded little by little, and our cities are being abandoned. We need a total moratorium on building on green field and green belt sites until ALL the disused sites and derelict buildings have been put to use.
    7 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Julia Chantrell Picture
  • Food waste management
    Current process of utilisation of food waste , leads to increase of CO2 emissions. It would perhaps teach people that they should care about their environment, about the fact that waste is a problem which must be passed on further and it doesn’t end with placing used wastes in the bin. Conscious consumption and shopping
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Martyna Pawliczek Picture
  • Exeter as car-free city
    Vehicle emissions are one of the main sources of outdoor air pollution, particularly in cities. Most urban areas in the UK, including Exeter, have very high or illegal levels of NO2 pollution. Breathing in air pollution can stunt lung development, increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, worsen asthma symptoms, and even result in lung cancer. The effects of toxic air are worse for those most vulnerable individuals (e.g. children and older people). However, up to a 40% reduction in NO2 levels has been reported on car-free days. Transport is also the fastest growing source of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions, the largest contributor to the environment and climate emergency. Furthermore, cars, and the associated infrastructure, congest roads and take up valuable space, and they divert investment and interest from public transport. To ensure a sustainable city that meets government objectives for air quality and moral obligations regarding the climate emergency, we must take steps away from our current over-dependency on private cars. (Obviously there will be exceptions for emergency, electric and delivery vehicles, as well as drivers or passengers with disabilities.) Indeed, many cities worldwide are beginning to shift away from cars, towards more environmentally friendly and citizen-focused means of mobility. Hamburg, Oslo, Helsinki and Madrid have revealed plans to become predominantly private car free cities, and York has also recently announced plans to become a car-free city. We need to invest in cycling infrastructure and pedestrianisation, restricting inner-city parking and increasing public transport provisions, with the aim of reducing pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. These adaptations are also likely to significantly benefit public health. Exeter is in an ideal position to implement such changes. It is a relatively small but fast-growing city; indeed, the flow of commuters is estimated to rise by 25–30% over the next 20 years. Many roads in the city centre are already pedestrianised or restricted-access only. There are currently 9 train stations (with more planned) and 32 bus routes, with a bus station in the process of redevelopment, as well as plans for ‘smart ticketing’. Furthermore, we have an established but growing cycling community, with cycle routes and provisions throughout the city. There is also a successful electric bike hire scheme within the city. Moreover, there are a number of Park and Ride services in place, with plans for another having recently been approved. Making Exeter a car-free city – a bold and ambitious but crucial step – would demonstrate that the City of Exeter is at the forefront of attempts to address the environment and climate emergency, leading the way for other cities to follow suit.
    26 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Louise Venables
  • Save The Cowley Chestnut Tree
    Chestnut trees are now on the endangered list, and more must be done to preserve mature trees like this one that can adsorb 1 ton of carbon dioxide in their lifetime, and emit 260 lbs of oxygen a season. Local residents are incensed public amenities have disappeared from the area in recent years, and now want to take a stand to protect this much valued chestnut tree. This chestnut tree was originally planted by the Gibbons family that ran a bakery on the site approx 100 years ago, and this tree is the only surviving feature of 'Old Cowley' and should be protected by a Tree Preservation Order, for the prosperity and amenity of future generations. 1,500 signatures will trigger a extensive debate at Oxford City Council on the Cowley Chestnut Tree.
    1,697 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by David Henwood Picture