• Put baby changing areas in ALL male toilets
    This is important as Dads are growing in their influence in a family and yet so many facilities are STILL slacking for them to appropriately be there for their families.
    6 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Klaire Sutcliffe-Campo
  • Support a Living Wage for Ayrshire School Cleaners!
    As the new school term gets underway, school cleaners and janitors employed across Ayrshire by the local schools contractor, Mitie, are taking to the streets to campaign against their second-class treatment by Mitie and the local council. GMB Scotland, the union for school support staff, is stepping up its campaign for a Living Wage for school cleaners. GMB Scotland is also demanding that janitors working in local schools, which are operated on behalf of North, South and East Ayrshire councils by the contractor, Mitie, are paid at least the same as council employed janitors. Members of the public across Ayrshire will be asked to sign petitions backing the cleaners and janitors at special street stalls organised by the union in Kilmarnock, Ayr and Irvine over the next few weeks. In each of the 13 Mitie managed schools across Ayrshire low paid, predominantly women, workers are being treated as second class citizens with the full knowledge of the political leadership of local councils. School cleaners employed by Mitie are paid nearly £1 below the Scottish Living Wage, currently £8.75 an hour, which is paid as a minimum to every other council worker. Many of these workers transferred to Mitie's employment from the local council but have seen their pay erode year on year compared to their colleagues, doing the same jobs, and still employed by the council. There are even examples of women working in school kitchens and also as school cleaners who see their rate of pay drop when they change a council overall for a Mitie one. Sign below to support GMB Scotland’s campaign for all our school staff to earn at least the Living Wage and for fair pay for all school support staff, no matter what school they work in.
    124 of 200 Signatures
    Created by GMB SCOTLAND Picture
  • Boris Johnson’s apology for saying Muslim women look like bank robbers
    Who does he think he is? He made these comments thinking that he has the authority and no one has the power to do anything. He should be made to apologise otherwise other people will think it is ok to make such comments.
    66 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Jitu Miah
  • Make UK government recognise same-sex relationships in divorce law
    Currently, if you enter a same-sex affair, whether you are in a heterosexual marriage or a same-sex one, the affair is not considered adultery. This is because the UK law around this does not recognise a same-sex relationship in the same way it recognises a heterosexual one. This is not equality.
    73 of 100 Signatures
    Created by L SCHORN
  • Keep hatred out of pride
    This inaction from Pride in London has sent shock waves around the world. Hate is not the message of pride and it was platformed for all the world to see .
    66 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Karen Richards
  • Bring Back Frida Kahlo's Iconic Lipstick to Help Fund Women in Mexico
    Frida Kahlo was a cultural icon who celebrated her beauty with internationally acclaimed flare. She taught young girls everywhere that despite their disability or background - beauty is for all. Her iconic dark brows and lipstick adorn the walls of the public and elite alike, in her stunning original works or dog-eared printouts, torn from borrowed magazines. Frida made a stand for women everywhere, challenging perceptions of beauty and idealised standards for women, she stood for strength, for justice and for equality. We can't all afford an original piece to honour her memory but what better way to do it than by keeping those ideals alive through the medium of make-up.
    12 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Sadie Medhurst-Griffiths
  • Female Carers to have the right to wear company polo shirts in the summer months.
    This is important because female tunics are to heavy to wear in the summer months.
    8 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Liz McDougall
  • Mandatory training in ALL areas of domestic abuse for Family courts &Cafcass
    It is vital for victims and children’s voices to be heard, supported and truly understood. Only then can informed decisions be made for the people involved and safety be paramount. This is sadly not happening currently and the statistics continue to grow. Please see latest report on family courts and domestic abuse conducted by the APPG inquiry https://www.naccc.org.uk/downloads/NewsItems/APPG_Inquiry_report_Domestic_Abuse_Child_Contact_and_the_Family_Court.pdf We need to unite and help stamp out abuse and suport the victims and children when they need it the most. Thank you.
    118 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Victoria Robertson
  • Remove VAT from female sanitary products
    Due to the new sugar tax, the government is set to make £250 million a year. The very most female sanitary products could make from VAT is £130 million a year, and that's if every woman in the UK needed them, which clearly isn't possible, but it shows the maximum amount they could possibly make. It's clear sugar tax will make up this difference and making money wasn't even its primary reason for it being implemented. It's obvious female sanitary products are not a luxury item, and women all over the globe need them. Being charged VAT on them is simply ludicrous. There is simply no excuse now for VAT being on female sanitary products anymore even at a reduced rate. Periods aren't a choice, and female sanitary products are necessary to deal with it. Women shouldn't be charged on a product they NEED - not WANT, NEED. It doesn't make sense, its obvious it doesn't make sense and now it doesn't make sense financially either.
    17 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Sam Lee
  • A Tight Spot
    A Tight Spot The big news this week on the BBC news channel, is that Meghan Markle has started wearing tights to prepare for joining the royal family, who don’t go bare legged, for unexplained reasons of protocol. This reminds me of having to wear tights as part of my school uniform. Never mind the gender pay gap I was a child and had no income, yet I was obliged to buy a product that had built in obsolesces. My tights didn’t last long before they laddered, especially on splintery school chairs and under desks where gum had been secreted. Nail varnish only halted a ladder for so long. I was lucky if I could wear a pair of tights more than five times before throwing them out. That’s a total of a week’s wear per pair. In today’s prices Marks and Spencer sell three pairs of thick black tights for £5. There are about 40 weeks of term time in the school year, and no one wears socks in summer, or those sheer tights that tear when you are taking them out of the packet, so I spent £66 on tights each year. Or rather my parents spent £66 on tights per daughter per school year, and I have two sisters, so my parents were spending £200 per year on tights. They might have done this buy giving their daughters pocket money and hoping we learnt budgeting skills, but there was no way of saving or scheming that avoided the need for their daughters to buy 40 pairs of tights each. According to government statistics, in Britain today there are 1,564,819 girls of secondary school age in state schools, and many will attend schools where trousers are not part of the uniform for girls. So at the end of each school year British school girls have spent about £104,321,267 on 62,592,760 pairs of tights all of which are slowly decomposing on landfill sites. And I mean slowly, tights have the wondrous ability to ladder like greased lightening and decompose at a snails pace. It strikes me that this is not a great use of the earth’s resources and is good neither for the environment or the wealth of Britain’s school girls and their parents. I never liked wearing tights. I didn’t like that they failed to keep me warm in winter, and were sweaty all year round, and sweaty means fungal infections. So I say that protocol needs to move in the other direction. Wearing tights does not equate with decency. I am proud not to be royal and bare legs are fine by me. I just wish the people who design school uniform weren’t influenced by the royal family as much as they seem to be. There are better thing that Britain’s school, girls could buy with £104,321,267. Heck if all girls could wear trousers to school up-skirting and environmental disaster would both suffer a body blow. Others have campaigned on the cost of tampons for school girls, I say there’s more work for feminists to do. Ask Damian Hinds to make wearing trousers and option for all Britain’s school girls.
    28 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Caroline Henthorne
  • Homelessness because of domestic violence
    Homelessness due to domestic violence is an issue which women are unable to control, these women often have nowhere else to go which is why they are resorted to living on the streets. Women on the streets are vulnerable, especially if they are pregnant or have dependent children, consequently, it is crucial for the government and local authorities to help eliminate this and recognise more women as homeless.
    20 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Ellie Lewtas
  • We need LBGTQA Fiction and Non Fiction sections in Bookshops
    If you walk into a chain Bookstore like WHSmith, Waterstones, The Works etc. you will almost inevitably never find Gay, Lesbian and Trans related fictional material that is clearly and obviously available for purchase and Non-fiction is often hidden away among Feminist and activist books which for many is highly inaccessible or is culturally shunned. This places young people and indeed older members of the Queer community in a truly difficult position. LBGTQA+ fiction is notoriously hard to get hold of in Highstreet chains and is often hidden among books about Hetrosexual people where you have to physically ask staff to find it for your which for some LBGTQA+ people puts them at risk. There needs to be at least a shelf or two dedicated to LBGTQA+ fiction and non fiction so that LBGTQA+ people can access cultural resources that involve them and their identities. It will also help to normalise the existence of LBGTQA+ people and grant educational resources to those who aren't that are accessible to all ages. Granting LBGTQA+ Fiction and Non Fiction their own dedicated section will display the historical literary achievements of people within those minorities in a way that no other place does.
    8 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Hanna Sutcliffe