• SAVE THE ALL INN ONE PUB, FOREST HILL, FROM DEMOLITION
    This is a thriving and successful community pub that has served the area since the 1850s. We urge the London Borough of Lewisham planning department to refuse the application to demolish this handsome, landmark, historic pub which is well-used and much-loved by the community.
    362 of 400 Signatures
    Created by South East London CAMRA
  • Save our Libraries Essex (SOLE)
    Essex County Council have announced plans to close 25 libraries and to turn a further 19 over to be run by local communities to save money. My local library, in West Mersea, employs 2 people for 21 hours a week. Not only will they lose their jobs if these closures go ahead, but so will all the staff at the threatened 44 libraries. My library is thriving. It is always busy with people of all ages reading newspapers and periodicals, borrowing books, DVDs and CDs, accessing the internet, researching their family ancestry and speaking to others. Libraries are fantastic assets to the community and need to be saved. No libraries in Essex should be closed or downgraded to being run by volunteers The elderly population of Essex need these libraries. Many do not have computers and some of them may not speak to anyone else in their day. We need local libraries in local communities which can be accessed on foot or bike, by all sections of society. Please think again before implementing these closures.
    11,734 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Bry Mogridge Picture
  • All4 back to Freesat
    To ensure All4 is inclusive and available to all the population and does not exclude those who cannot receive it by other means.
    4 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Rodger Meadows
  • Stop the Closure of the New School Butterstone
    The New School Butterstone was originally founded in rural Perthshire, as a safehaven for education for young people with complex needs such as asperges and autism. These students come to Butterstone having found mainstream education challenging, and find that they are able to get on and thrive in an environment tailored to their needs. Smaller classes, individualized lessons and like minded students. WHAT will happen to these young people now? Will they simply be segwayed back into mainstream education in large classes, where they will be misunderstood, ignored and left at a disadvantage. We shouldn't be loosing places like 'The New School...' we should be gaining them, and learning from them. Please sign and help!
    4 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Jeni Deards Picture
  • Don't Cut Faversham Library Opening Hours
    The library is one of the few indoor public spaces in Faversham that everyone has access to. Kent County Council have just completed a major refurbishment of the library, if council tax payers are to get the benefit from this expenditure they need a library which at a minimum retains its opening hours. A 16 hour reduction in weekly opening could mean the library being closed for one extra day a week and opening hours reducing on other days. This will be a considerable inconvenience to local residents and could lead to a reduction in users and further cuts. Please help us maintain library hours and once you have signed the petition visit kent.gov.uk/lrastrategy to respond to the formal consultation
    890 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Julian Saunders
  • Post office for Bonnyrigg
    It is important for the residents and especially the elderly to have a local post office for them to use.
    256 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Alan Scott Picture
  • Save Welshpool Library
    The County Council wish to relocate the library to the museum, which is half the size and result in the downgrading of both services. Welshpool Library is purpose built in a central location which is convenient for all. It has parking spaces and is instantly recognisable. In the proposed location, it would house less than half the current bookstock, and there is very little space for children's storytimes and activities. The Museum would be squeezed into an upstairs space and jobs would be lost.
    7 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Roger Foulkes Picture
  • SAVE TENDRING'S PUBLIC LIBRARIES
    Essex County Council have announced a list of 44 libraries across the county which are at risk of closing down including 4 in Tendring. Libraries are a part of the fabric of our local community which have provided generations of families with access to literature, education, knowledge, learning and support. Libraries are an essential part of public services just like Schools, and Hospitals enabling poor children from disadvantaged families to access information, knowledge and skills to give them a decent chance in life. Libraries are fantastic assets to the community and need to be saved for future generations. https://www.essexlive.news/news/essex-news/future-every-library-essex-revealed-2221093
    879 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Steven Walker Picture
  • Keep Sheffield in Yorkshire
    To pursue a "Greater Sheffield" region on Manchester-lines is to disregard Sheffield's small-town feel, to create an unnatural identity over the top of a stronger and older regional sense of self, and fails to serve the people of Sheffield. The Northern Powerhouse project has failed to revive post-industrial communities from within; to attempt to revitalise South Yorkshire by expanding its influence to a non-diverse, middle class commuter belt is an insult to the old steel and coal communities of the area. Sheffield can either choose to be a city that serves those outside it or serves those within it. Sheffield does not have the financial or political clout of Leeds. No, Sheffield and Rotherham make things. We can either be the failed pseudo-capital of an ahistorical creation, or the industrial and engineering centre not just of a devolved Yorkshire, but of the UK. Sheffield does not have, and does not want the economic basis to be a regional capital. Sheffield wants jobs, and jobs that play to our strengths-what is the point in trying to be something we aren't, a financial and business centre, when we are already the Steel City? The choice of the councils is not one that affects merely municipal politics, it is one that affects history. Sheffield and Rotherham are being erased-piecemeal from Yorkshire and both the rest of the county and the two areas stand to lose. Since 1974 there has been a cynical and apathetic treatment of regional identity in the UK. The exit of Middlesbrough from Yorkshire demonstrates that once a city leaves, it doesn't come back. Sheffield and Rotherham councils are choosing to dilute their Yorkshire past rather than play on its strengths. At a time when the national vision of England both is weaponised by the fringes and reflects the landscape, language and lifestyle only of the South, surely it is wise to invest in existing identities that stem from place, not race. Sheffield's diversity and multiculturalism is better mirrored by West Yorkshire than Derbyshire. Yorkshire identity has played a great role in the integration of new communities elsewhere in the region, couldn't it have the same effect in Sheffield? A Yorkshire Mayor would not only reinforce Yorkshire's proud history, but encourage often isolated communities to participate in shaping the future of such a rich heritage. For those living in the rest of Yorkshire, remember what Sheffield has and will give you: Pulp, steel, Arctic Monkeys, The Full Monty, Sean Bean, a member of Monty Python, the setting for multiple TV series, and three England footballers. We are the quaint but stoic arthouse of Yorkshire, and will stubbornly remain so.
    5 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Dylan Barker
  • Eating Disorder Services for East Yorkshire
    I want to highlight the sparsity of resources in the NHS for treating patients with eating disorders. This is a national issue but it has to begin somewhere. I mention anorexia in particular because it came into our family, but the same points apply to all eating disorders. The eating disorder charity BEAT states: "Anorexia has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder, from medical complications associated with the illness as well as suicide." So where is the funding? Where are the specialists? The Royal College of Psychiatrists report: “We are seeing waits of up to 16 months for non-urgent referrals. It is really worrying, because we know that the more quickly people start receiving treatment the quicker they are to respond to it.” Anorexia is an illness. Despite what some people might think, no-one chooses to be anorexic in the same way that no-one chooses cancer. It is a physical illness and it is a mental illness but it is also a neglected illness as far as the NHS is concerned. In the East Riding of Yorkshire, until recently, there was no provision for eating disorders. This year, CAMHS has established an Eating Disorder Service. What about those patients who are not children? Those patients like my own loved one. Four years ago, a beautiful, talented, artistic young lady whom I love with all my heart fell prey to anorexia and I watched in impotence as she shrank before my eyes. She was 16 and resisted medical treatment for the best part of a year. Once she accepted help, her GP was wonderful at keeping an eye on her and referring her to a general mental health therapist but there were no specialists in eating disorders or any specialist treatment. Early in 2017, when my loved one became so ill that she weighed 5 stone and had a BMI of 12, she was admitted to a gastroenterology ward at the general hospital. The doctors and nurses were marvellous but they were not experts in the treatment of eating disorders. However, they found her a place at a residential ED Clinic in Grimsby, 54 miles and a drive of an hour and a half away. Grimsby is not in East Yorkshire; it’s in Lincolnshire. Still, we were lucky. Did you see the programme, ‘Wasting Away: The Truth about Anorexia’, which told the story of news reader Mark Austin’s daughter? I watched in tears as their story unfolded in an almost carbon copy of our own. Now if someone in the public eye, with a doctor for a wife, had no clue what to do, and if help wasn’t readily available to them, then what chance did we have? Mark Austin's research taught him that there are only 200 beds for ED patients in Britain and his programme revealed a young woman from Nottingham who was sent to Edinburgh for treatment. Her mum had to make a 600 mile round trip to visit her. UK eating disorder statistics • 1.6 million people in the UK are affected by an eating disorder • 11% of the 1.6 million people struggling with an eating disorder are male • Eating disorders are more common in individuals between the ages of 14 and 25 years old • There are up to 18 new diagnoses of bulimia nervosa, per 100,000 people, per year • 1 in 100 women aged between 15 and 30, are affected by anorexia nervosa • 10% of people affected by an eating disorder suffer from anorexia nervosa • 40% of people affected by an eating disorder suffer from bulimia nervosa • The rest of sufferers fall into the BED (binge eating disorder) or OSFED (other specified feeding or eating disorder) categories of eating disorders • Research suggests that the earlier that eating disorder treatment is sought, the better the sufferer’s chance of recovery These UK eating disorder statistics are derived from data published by Beat and Mind. For the sake of the futures of our young people, we need to hold the government to account, locally and nationally, to keep their promises and to ensure that there is money in every local authority for ED Services.
    108 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Catherine Minnis Picture
  • Fairer PAY for value of work.
    For far too long the non-operational side has been outcast and a forgotten part of the prison service, whether it be admin, parole, canteen services or estates maintenance The Scottish Prison Service seem to think it’s acceptable to place families in what is essentially poverty by not fairly rewarding the work that they do the level of qualifications that are expected of them and the above and beyond attitude that is taken for granted. They bang on about the other benefits that there are for working for the prison service but in all honesty there are pretty much none, they bang on about the pension(the ones that have been Cut so much they’re effectively worthless) the staff discounts (available from a big company where you have to buy gift cards and often find the price cheaper elsewhere anyway) the sick pay and sick entitlement (which is greatly received but also needed due to the stressful nature of the job remembering that the staff including the non-operational are in contact with the most dangerous members of the public on a daily basis, the constant barrage of extra work and extra tasks with no extra reward they are grinding down their staff and sending them dangerously close to a burnout) There is a clear divide throughout the SPS where it seems that the non-operational staff are degraded and forgotten about. The Scottish prison service do not pay appropriately for these posts. For example a member of admin staff at one of the prisons effectively has 3 roles to do after 2 colleagues got fed up and left. Here’s the big surprise they can’t fill the post because the wages are so poor. Another member of non-operational staff at another prison keeps getting tasks added to their job role with no extra reward and then subsequently is rebuked when they cannot deliver on their original role. Yet another member of staff is effectively doing the job of two people because the post for the other person has lay vacant for months. They are afraid to fill the post with agency workers as then they may well be subject to an equal pay claim is it right that even temporary workers are better paid and have better working conditions than those employed by the prison service. Another prison is so short on staff they have had to beg, borrow and steal staff from across the country to deliver on a project. Yet another has had vacant posts for months upon months and has had to borrow staff from elsewhere effectively leaving them short and yet another prison has a vacant post and is sending labour to a different prison leaving one staff member to cover 3 roles and still no one is taking notice. Then there are the “B” bands the lowest paid workers in the prison service. Many have to travel considerable distances to get to work and are constantly belittled and passed over for other colleagues rewards before themselves. Such as recently an equal pay claim which was settled out of court and the prison service paid out£4000 to each of the the C, D and E bands but they didn’t even consider the B bands even with this 4000 the wages of the C, D and E bands are not proportional to the jobs that they do and nowhere near in line with what other similar roles are paid. But what about the B bands who just keep getting more and more tasks added to their job description without any extra reward. As it was said by the upper eschelons if the prison service someone has to loose out to give someone else something and yet they can hand back millions of pounds each year to the government. It is time that the Scottish Prison Service and the Scottish Government sit up and take notice of the utter state of despair that the prison service is in. Time that they take a serious look at themselves and at the crash in morale they have caused and the real life implications of the desicions that they make. Why should anyone ever have to loose out? What about fair reward for the work that they do?
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Anonymous SPSemployee
  • Gt. Yarmouth Winter Gardens
    This building has been one of the main attractions for over hundred years along what once was the golden mile. You have destroyed the town centre, do you want to destroy what is left of our seafront.
    12 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Mac Skilton Picture