• Keep my workshop
    Without it I can’t continue my business
    631 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Tori Willis Picture
  • Safe School Streets for Sheffield
    School Streets are roads next to schools where traffic is restricted during the times of the day when children are arriving or leaving school. Sheffield has 25 schools in areas of high, sometimes illegal, air pollution. High air pollution levels exacerbate respiratory illnesses like asthma and recent studies have shown that children exposed to high pollution levels have reduced lung capacity that can affect them for the rest of their lives. Sheffield has a clean air strategy that already recognises the need to take action on poor air quality, especially around schools. 20mph and anti-idling initiatives are great but will not make enough of a difference. Edinburgh, Southwark, Hackney and Solihull have already implemented School Streets to protect children from traffic and traffic related pollution at the school gate. School Streets encourages active travel, improves air quality in the classroom, and reduces traffic congestion for everyone.
    1,535 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Graham Turnbull Picture
  • SAVE HUNCOAT'S WILDLIFE HABITAT
    Huncoat Colliery is one of the best places in Hyndburn to see butterflies, wildflowers and other wildlife. Since the Colliery stopped operating in the 1960s, the land has been reclaimed by nature and is now a haven for wildlife. Although classed as brownfield land, Huncoat Colliery is more like a nature reserve. 21 butterfly species are present at Huncoat Colliery, 13 of which are in decline, including 2 species classed as a priority in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan (Small Heath and White-letter Hairstreak). Butterflies are attracted to Huncoat Colliery by large areas of wildflowers, including stunning patches of wild orchids. Huncoat Colliery is an accessible site which gives local people easy access to nature, as well as providing educational interest. Sadly, Huncoat Colliery has been earmarked for housing development. This could be terrible news for local biodiversity, as we stand to lose an area rich in wildlife at a time when it’s more important than ever to protect the precious habitat we have left. This site has the potential to be a destination and a contribution to tourism in the Borough.
    555 of 600 Signatures
    Created by KERRY GORMLEY Picture
  • No zip wire at Honister Slate Mine, Lake District
    The proposed zip wire will have a huge impact on the landscape's character and loss of beautiful tranquility. Planning officers had recommended the plan at Honister Slate Mine be refused due to the impact on the landscape. But the Lake District National Park Authority's planning committee went ahead and approved the zip wire. The views are outstanding and would be spoilt by the 1km-long (3,400ft) zip wire. The zip wire had previously been refused permission in 2011 and 2012.
    8 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Kevin West
  • Gt. Yarmouth Winter Gardens
    This building has been one of the main attractions for over hundred years along what once was the golden mile. You have destroyed the town centre, do you want to destroy what is left of our seafront.
    13 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Mac Skilton Picture
  • Fossetts For The People - Build Homes For Southend.
    Over the last decade, house prices in the borough have shot up by around 50%, meaning many local people and families have been priced out of the housing market. With a dire shortage of good quality, affordable private rental properties in the town and a very long waiting list for council properties, Southend Borough Council could utilise this land to build in the region of 400 new homes. This would not only substantially relieve chronic housing pressures, but also bring in much needed revenue to the Council which has seen its grant from central government cut by around £8 million year on year to the tune of £40 million in total. The NHS sold this publicly-owned plot of land, where previously a new NHS diagnostic and treatment centre had been planned, for £7.8 million in August this year. The value of this land once developed is estimated to be in excess of £40 million - potentially meaning a very handsome profit for a private developer and its shareholders! Southend Council's recent track record of building 'affordable' housing has fallen well short of its target of 30% with figures showing it has only attained a level of 19%. The term 'affordable' is something of a misnomer and in reality just means '80% of market value', which is not affordable at all for many many people. In January 2018, the New Economics Foundation looked into the planned developments on NHS land which had been sold off, or was due to be sold off. - Of the homes to be built for sale on NHS land, four out of five will be unaffordable to a nurse on an average salary. And where they could afford the mortgage repayments, a nurse would have to save for an average of 53 years to afford the deposit. - Only one in 10 of the homes built on sold-off NHS land will be for genuinely affordable social rent. (There are 1.2 million English households on the waiting list for social housing.) - The average expected sale price for these new homes, based on area estimates, is £315,279. This is 10 times the annual salary of a nurse. In Southend, the average property price is £304,774.
    480 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Fossetts For The People
  • Remove Pinkham Way nature conservation site from the North London Waste Plan
    There is no justification or evidence for including this nature conservation site in the new North London Waste Plan. Haringey's own Regulatory Committee has recommended that it be removed. PLEASE NOTE: This issue will now be considered at the Haringey Cabinet Meeting on 22 January 2019, and not the one in November mentioned above. The point of the petition remains exactly the same, and it will now remain open for signing until just before the new date in January.
    2,294 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Pinkham Way Alliance
  • Change the crossing near Bitterne Station (Southampton) to make it safe for pedestrians & cyclists.
    It takes 7 mins to cross as a pedestrian with the lights, so people take risks running across. There's no safe cycle route, but it could be much safer with a few dropped kerbs and some paint. It is monstrous that the proposed Highways England scheme does not take this into account. We need a regular combined pedestrian/cyclist phase over this dangerous junction. Also, eg: - pavement alteration for bikes by derelict hairdresser and opposite for bikes. - crossing point is needed from station across to Athelstan Rd - over just Bitterne Rd West instead of multiple crossings. - traffic calming needed by the concrete blocks on Bullar Rd, as the crossing is often ignored by vehicles. Please join us on 18th Nov: https://www.facebook.com/events/266846273945353/ (or contact us via http://www.southamptoncyclingcampaign.org.uk/about-us/contact-us/ )
    865 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Lyn Brayshaw Picture
  • Stop 332 Hamilton Street (previously Nursery)becoming a Hotel
    Hamilton Street is not suitable for a Hotel as it is a residential area with limited parking. A 13 bedroom hotel could attract more than 15 cars (staff included) to an already congested and busy street which has Atherton's only high school and is a route for many primary school children going to St Michael's and Parklee. A hotel is open 24 hours with people coming and going at various times day and night this will cause noise and disturbance for the streets residents. How do we know that it will not become a hostel with up to 26 people or more living in it once planning permission is granted. Many people are already of the view that this is a trick to mask a more sinister plan by the applicant. The area around the war memorial has been made an area of beauty for all the community, a Hotel directly opposite is likely to ruin all the hard work and effort which has been carried out by local people to make the area so great again. A hostel could mean our War Memorial is used as a hangout area. On a personal note I have young children and am deeply concerned about the large number of strangers that would staying overnight in a hotel/hostel close to my family with no one there to manage the hotel overnight. The plans show only 1 full time job and 2 part time so it doesn't imply a traditional hotel where staff are on site 24/7 I have lived on Hamilton Street for over 18 years and cannot believe that a proposal like this could be considered. Please support us in preventing this application from being accepted. You can view the application at https://apps.wigan.gov.uk/planapps/PlanAppsDetails.asp?passAppNo=A/18/86272/CU Thank you
    538 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Kathryn Walker-Yates Picture
  • Closure of day centres for the elderly
    Loneliness is considered to be one of the main problems among elderly persons which can have a serious effect on health so why would the government close such active community centres?
    11 of 100 Signatures
    Created by annie K
  • Keep Diesel Pollution Out Of The Ely Valley
    The proposed road will force over 400 village school children and residents in the valley to breathe polluting, health harming, diesel freight traffic fumes. It would bring deadly traffic pollution and noise from freight vehicles into an environmentally sensitive valley that houses two primary schools. The list of long term effects of air pollution on children and the elderly is growing almost daily. Wales has a Future Generations Act designed to ensure we consider the needs of future generations, but this road, aimed at servicing the loss making Cardiff Airport which is actually owned by the Welsh Assembly Government, means the future health of Ely Valley school children and residents appears to have been abandoned. The Welsh Assembly Government is planning on spending £100+ million of taxpayers money on this road that will service their own business. The children affected by these plans have no voice. We must speak for them.
    444 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Glynis Lloyd
  • A Zebra Crossing For Monmouth Drive For Safer Entry To Sutton Park
    Sutton Park is the heart and lungs of our town and everyone should have safe easy access to enjoy all that it offers. Further, we should encourage people to leave their cars at home and walk. This is healthier, greener and, with proposed future parking charges, financially prudent. But trying to get into Sutton Park on foot through the Boldmere Gate entrance on Stonehouse Road can be a dangerous business, especially if you are elderly or walking with children. Our community includes many families and older residents who may be be put off enjoying the park, or end up driving there out of road safety concerns. We are, therefore, launching a major campaign to look into getting a proper zebra crossing at the site. We understand the complex nature of the junction but also that Royal Sutton Town Council have substantial funds accumulated from our precept that could fund the work.
    444 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Manish Puri